St. Croix

stcroix

The St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin (or the St. Croix Band for short) is a Federally recognized Indian Tribe located in Northwestern Wisconsin, along the St. Croix River valley and watershed.

The St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin is the eastern half of the historic St. Croix Chippewa Indians who lost federal recognition in 1854.  The St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin regained their federal recognition under the Indian Reorganization Act. The western half of the historical tribe, the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Minnesota, are a non-Federally recognized component of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe. Due to loss of Federal recognition in 1854, as one of two successors apparent of the historical St. Croix Chippewa Indians, the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin do not have a formal Indian Reservation.

The St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin is a federally recognized tribe governed by a five-member council elected for two-year terms. The Tribal Council is responsible for the general welfare of tribal members and the management of day-to-day tribal business. The Council is governed by the tribal constitution and by-laws, which were originally ratified in 1934 under the Indian Reorganization Act. Their current population (as of 2014) is 1,054 tribal members.

Due to not having a formal Indian Reservation, the lands constituting the St. Croix Indian Reservation are composed of small tracts of lands representing communities made up of families who have lived in the same vicinity for generations. The reservation communities are scattered with about 50 miles being the longest distance between any two of them. The five major communities are Sand Lake, Danbury, Round Lake, Maple Plain and Gaslyn. They occupy land in Barron, Burnett, and Polk counties.

View the St. Croix website.

Tribal Labor Contact:  Ann Belisle  (715) 349-2195, extension 5127, or Michael Decorah, Intergovernmental Affairs  (715) 645-2476